Contact us Monday through Friday 8am to 5pm at 715-327-4402

SERVICE TO COMMUNITY BUILDS STRENGTH

At Northwest Passage we know that service to others not only provides benefits to those who receive, but also to those who give.   This therapeutic lifestyle choice works to improve one’s health through a number of avenues.  On the most basic level, an effective way to distract from emotional distress is to contribute to others who may be experiencing some manner of distress of their own.  Purposefully turning attention from internal strife, outward to the lives of others is both an exercise of empathy and mindfulness.  Research has shown that community service has been shown to bolster the physical and mental health of participants.  Finally, reaching out to volunteer or help others in their environment, can offer a path for youth to build connections with the world around them.  It has been shown that such connections can have a positive and healing effect for all humans.

Feeling Good by Doing Good

FEED MY STARVING CHILDREN

Community Service Changes Lives

“BY LEARNING GENEROSITY AND SERVICE TO COMMUNITY, WE DEVELOP A BROADER RELATIONSHIP WITH THE WORLD AROUND ONE’S SELF.”

RESOURCES

The PassageWay is grounded in solid research. If you’re interested in learning more about the background of our approach, please dive in and investigate some of the resources we’ve used in developing our guiding principals.

EFFECTS OF VOLUNTEERING ON THE VOLUNTEER

The Effects of Volunteering on the Volunteer” is a key analysis of the impacts that service can have on our lives. Published in the Law and Contemporary Problems journal by John Wilson (Duke University) and Mar Musick (University of Texas, Austin).

Wilson and Musick offer a great look into why service is an important part of our work at Passage:

  • Cultural, personal interest, and community organizations are particularly likely to have members scoring high in generalized trust and in reciprocity with neighbors.
  • Students who had been active in volunteer organizations and social movements while in college belonged to more civic organizations and were more politically engaged than non-activists a decade later.
  • Studies indicate that volunteering can inhibit anti-social behavior, albeit to a modest degree.
  • By helping others, individuals may develop stronger networks that buffer stress and reduce disease risk.
  • Volunteering can foster trust and intimacy and encourage the provider to anticipate that reciprocal help will be forthcoming when it is needed.
4-H & Service

4-H is an invaluable community resource, check out their website to find more information.

Here are a few of our favorite resources:

IS VOLUNTEERING A PUBLIC HEALTH INTERVENTION? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS OF THE HEALTH AND SURVIVAL OF VOLUNTEERS

Written by Caroline E. Jenkinson (of the University of Exeter Medical School of the United Kingdom) et al. and can be found here: Volunteering and Public Health

  • The United Nations defines volunteering as an act of free will that results in benefits to others outside of, or in addition to support given to close family members.
  • The main reason given for volunteering tends to be altruistic, such as to ‘give something back’ to their community, or to an organization or charity that has supported them in some way.
  • In terms of dosage, however, more volunteering would have greater effects on physical activity and associated physical health outcomes. However, it emerges the opposite may be true for mental health; i.e. less volunteering may be more beneficial.
  • Synthesis of observational data suggests that people who choose to volunteer are at a lower risk of mortality, and may experience some benefits in terms of physical and mental health.
FEELINGS OF GRATITUDE ARE GOOD FOR THE HEART AND SOUL

Paul Mills, a professor of family medicine and public health at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine checked into the physical impacts of the feelings of gratitude. Turns out that, “feel good vibes” are good for the body and the spirit.

Read the NPR article here.

IT’S ALL CONNECTED… The individual elements of the PassageWay are deeply ingrained with one another. Below are a couple of our favorite stories in which our kids revealed the beauty of service to others.

 

Pin It on Pinterest